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Boiman officially started at Touro on July 6, 2004, a month before the first class of medical students began their studies.
Boiman officially started at Touro on July 6, 2004, a month before the first class of medical students began their studies.

Staff Profile: Jackie Boiman, Administrative Assistant, Department of Basic Sciences

In this edition of 'Staff Profile,' we sat down with Jackie Boiman, Administrative Assistant, Department of Basic Sciences
Oct 28, 2019

Jackie Boiman, Administrative Assistant in the Department of Basic Sciences, can tell everyone that her name is on the moon.

Before coming to Touro University Nevada as one of its founding employees in 2004, Boiman worked for Grumman Aerospace, the company that built the lunar excursion module for the Apollo missions.

“It was a very exciting time in the 1960s,” Boiman recalled. “I worked in data reduction and testing but before that I worked in wing testing.”

After missions were completed, Boiman worked as part of a team that reduced data from the reports as they were transmitted from the astronauts themselves.

“All the astronauts knew me by name. They would come in and ask me how I was doing. I have signed pictures of them hanging in my home office,” she said.

Before Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin departed for the moon in June 1969, they took an assortment of items with them, including a signed piece of paper by the Grumman employees who worked to make the Apollo 11 mission possible. Boiman’s name is on that piece of paper, which the two astronauts left in a time capsule on the moon before returning back to Earth.

In 1985, Boiman relocated to Southern Nevada where she worked as the Rabbi’s secretary, and later front office manager, at Temple Beth Shalom for a decade.

After retiring for nine years, Boiman was encouraged to apply for a job at the soon-to-be-completed Touro University Nevada. Dressed in a long, black dress, Boiman completed her interview in a hard hat in the under-constructed building.

“When I got into my car after the interview, my dress was all white because of the cement,” she recalled. “At the time, the only parts of the building that were finished were the bullpen, the front desk, and a few offices.”

Boiman officially started at Touro on July 6, 2004, a month before the first class of medical students began their studies. 

“I still remember pizza boxes being strewn about the floor, and that’s basically how the first year went,” she said. “We were a small family and it kept us all together.”

Over the last 15 years, Boiman has grown along with the university. She didn’t any higher education experience prior to Touro, and she’s learned just as much as she did at Grumman.

“I enjoy everything about Touro,” she said. “I worked at Grumman for 16 years and I’m hoping to be at Touro longer than that. I always said ‘When the fun stops, get out.’ For me, the fun hasn’t stopped yet.”

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